Ask Dr. Blank:My son is in kindergarten and I am concerned that he may have difficulty learning how to read. He can’t seem to learn his letters and he resists having books read to him. I’m concerned he may have dyslexia or another issue. What can I do in this situation?

Whenever you suspect there’s a problem, it’s always a good first step to rule out physical difficulties such as hearing and vision problems. Your can do this through your health care provider and/or your child’s school. If you find that all is well in that domain, the next step would be to work with your local school district to determine what may be causing the behavior. In 1975, a federal law was passed called the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). As its name stated, the law is designed to assist students with disabilities. To access the services, call the main office of your local school district and ask for the “Child Find” program. It covers every child from birth through age 21. Under Child Find, schools must evaluate any child where a disability is suspected. Once the process is completed, you can use the information from the evaluation to help you make a decision about the next step in your child’s educational path. You may also find it helpful to go to the site ParentAdvocates.org to get advice tailored for parents who are seeking to obtain services that will assist their children.

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