Cloth Face Coverings for Children During COVID-19

From healthychildren.org

T​o protect ourselves and others from COVID-19, the CDC now recommends ​cloth face coverings be used when outside. But what about children? Read on for answers to some frequently asked questions about cloth face coverings and children during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Why are people wearing cloth face coverings right now?

Since so many people who have COVID-19 don’t have symptoms, wearing cloth face coverings reduces the chance of transmitting the virus through the spray of spit or respiratory droplets. This is especially true for when someone with COVID-19 comes within 6 feet of you, which is the range of transmitting infection through acts like sneezing or coughing.​​

Should children wear cloth face coverings?

Children under the age of 2 years should not wear cloth face coverings.

When do children need to wear cloth face coverings?

There are places where children should wear cloth face coverings. This includes places where they may not be able to avoid staying 6 feet away from others. For example, if you have to take them to the doctor, pharmacy, or grocery store.

However, there are other places where children do NOT need to wear a cloth face covering:

  • At home, assuming they have not been exposed to anyone with COVID-19.
  • Outside, as long as they can stay at least 6 feet away from others and can avoid touching surfaces. For example, it’s fine to take a walk as long as your children stay 6 feet away from others and do not touch tables, water fountains, playground equipment or other things that infected people might have touched.​

Caution: you may need to reconsider the use of cloth face coverings if:

  • The face coverings are a possible choking or strangulation hazards to your child.
  • Wearing the cloth face covering causes your child to touch their face more frequently than not wearing it.

Staying home and physical distancing is still the best way to protect your family from COVID-19. Especially for younger children who may not understand why they can’t run up toward other people or touch things they shouldn’t, it’s best to keep them home.Children who are sick (fever, cough, congestion, runny nos​e, diarrhea, or vomiting) should not leave home.

What if my child is scared of wearing a face covering?

It’s understandable that children may be afraid of cloth face coverings at first. Here are a few ideas to help make them seem less scary:

  • Look in the mirror with the face coverings on and talk about it.
  • Put a cloth face covering on a favorite stuffed animal.
  • Decorate them so they’re more personalized and fun.
  • Show your child pictures of other children wearing them.
  • Draw one on their favorite book character.
  • Practice wearing the face covering at home to help your child get used to it.

Read more here.

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